This month in our "Deluxe" section, we looked at tobacco paraphernalia in the car culture of the '40's and '50's. The tobacco industry was huge, and with $.06 cents as the average cost for a pack of smokes in that era, it's no wonder that many car enthusiasts took the time to smoke and ride in those early dream machines.

Back in the 1930's and 40's, few people were aware of the health risks associated with tobacco, and a very significant portion of the population smoked. In 1939, Fortune magazine found that 53 percent of adult American males smoked, and that number rose to 66% for adult males who were under forty years of age. The numbers for women were somewhat lower in comparison, but it can safely be said that a very large percentage of the country was smoking during this time period.

Naturally, this left the doors open for different manufacturers to create accessories for smokers that would come in handy whether behind the wheel, or sitting in the passenger's seat. We found a few that you may think are interesting, so check these goodies out

Pres-a-lite was a cigarette holder and lighter that quickly attached to the steering column of a car, making it easy or convenient for the driver to light up.


Pipe Holder If smoking tobacco through a pipe was your thing, vintage pipe holders like this one were used to keep your pipe within arm's reach at all times.


We are also looking at a 1930's cigarette holder and ashtray that used to be commonly given away to the public. This holder was given away by a car insurance agent and features a vintage unopened box of Chesterfield cigarettes, which can still be found in auction marketplaces like eBay.

Smokey Snuffers with smoking being so prevalent, people wanted to lower the risk of starting forest fires. These magnetic ashtrays made sure you had somewhere to put out your cigarette, instead of carelessly throwing it out of the car.

The saying, "One man's trash becomes another man's treasure" couldn't be truer than in the world of automobile restoration. If you have some vintage accessories and the facts about them that you wish to share with the public, drop us an e-mail at: saul.vargas@sorc.com