When building a convertible, the most touched part is the convertible rack or skeleton structure, which allows the car to go from an enclosed vehicle to a topless cruiser. Whether you have chrome, gold or powdercoating, this tech might interest you if you own a convertible. In time, the convertible hardware manages to fade, rust or simply needs to be redone due to normal wear and tear. Convertible lowrider owners need to have their cages redone.

We caught up with the pros at the Bow Tie Connection in San Pedro, California, who were working on a Chevy Impala convertible cage. Master technician Mike Lopez was telling us about the beauty of cruising in a convertible. "The beauty of a convertible is something that you need to experience to understand," he says. "Most of the time you'll enjoy a cruise or cruising with the top down, but there will be those times that the tops need to be up. A good example is when you need to wash your ride or transport it on a long trip."

In this issue, we are going to touch on some of the basics of the skeleton structure. In a future issue, we'll focus on canvas convertible tops, but for now check out how the Bow Tie Connection crew rebuilds them racks.

SOURCE
Cars, Inc. Bow Tie Connection
476 W. Fifth St.
San Pedro
CA  90731
Hubbard's Impala Parts
3116 Tucker St.
Burlington
NC  27215