1972 marked the final year of production on the first generation Monte Carlo. A classic in the making, the only changes this legendary Chevy saw during this year came in the form of metal rear trim molding, a crate grill, and the option to have Strato-bucket seats. That year, 180,819 of these beauties were produced, and most of them sold out nationwide, partially due to the car's successful ad campaign tagline; "Chevrolet: Building a Better Way To See The USA." The car also held the advantage of being an affordable car that was big enough to fit a 5-member family comfortably, with enough trunk space for luggage as well. To this day, the '72 Monte Carlo's function and design are the main reasons why they are still so popular within the Lowrider culture.

Born and raised in Escondido, CA, Jose remembers the '72 Monte Carlo well. His older cousin, Pete, owned a white '65 Impala, and introduced Jose to the Lowrider culture when he was just ten years old. He loved the sport so much that he was determined to follow in his cousin's footsteps, which he did at the age of 15 by purchasing his own'65 Impala SS. Jose's love for the sport stayed strong, although his ability to participate in it faded away for a while, as he decided to get married and start a family. Lowriding was always in the back of his mind during this time, and he decided to get back into the game after his little brother Jimmy passed away, leaving behind a 1950 Chevy, which Jose fixed up in his honor. After that, he purchased another '65 convertible Impala, after catching inspiration by attending the LRM San Diego show in 2004. While fixing up the '65 Impala, he purchased this '72 Monte Carlo at the Pomona Swap meet for $4,500 dollars.

When Jose first purchased the '72, he started fixing it up with the intentions of keeping it as a clean streetcar. As is the case with most builders, the project grew as he built it, gradually becoming a full-on show project before he even realized it. He took the car off of its frame and immediately got to work. Building a car was a smooth process for him, since Jose is the owner of Poway Auto Repair in Poway, CA, and had access to a clean facility in which to work. The car was built in just 7 months, as multiple tasks were tackled simultaneously. Jose worked on the engine compartment, while Miguel from AMC Kustoms in Riverside, CA, worked on the custom hydraulic setup. The bodywork on the Monte Carlo was performed by Chico at Candies Auto in San Diego, CA. Chico painted the car with a House of Kolor "Burple," and flaked out the top before coating it with Candy Blue. To add further detail, Japo, from Montclair, airbrushed some sexy ladies lying down on the skirts. After the car was sanded and polished, it was delivered to Armando's Rod and Custom in Hemet, CA, to receive a new interior. Armando and his coworker, George, gutted the interior, and replaced it with custom wrapped bucket seats in black leather, accenting the lines with blue inserts and double stitching. While the interior work was being handled, Jose shipped the tubular upper a-arms, molded bottom a-arms, bumper guards, radiator, door handles and springs to Miguel Chaves in Compton, CA, so he could engrave them. The last modification left on the build was to send out everything to get triple chrome plated at A&B Polishing in Montclair, CA. Once that was finished, Jose put the car back together in less than a year, and got it ready for the 2009 LRM Vegas Super Show. The name, "Out Of The Blues," was given to the car after it took home first place honors at the Vegas Super Show in the '70's Full Custom Class. A competitor who lost to Jose remarked, "You came out of the blue with this car," and the name stuck with the car ever since.