When Art Arroyo from Riverside, California, thought about naming his '85 Oldsmobile Cutlass, he knew the name had to be something smooth to go along with the vision he had for his fantasy ride. He tossed around many ideas, but it wasn't until he saw the texture and color of the interior in the Cutlass that he decided to name it after the smooth, frosted blue drink. "I love the color of Hypnotiq," Art says. "When I saw the finished product of the interior, to me the style along with the candy paint had a way of its own. I felt that the name would be perfect for my car because that drink definitely has a style of its own."

Art has always had a passion for lowrider vehicles. Born and raised in Los Angeles, he grew up seeing his neighbors as well as friends cruise around the block in their lowrider vehicles. "I feel that California definitely held down the sport of lowriding. I grew up here and I witnessed firsthand how the guys represented the lowrider culture. They were the ones who motivated me to get into the game," he says. Since age 10, he went to the lowrider shows with his sisters to see what crazy designs the lowrider guys would come out with next. He was fascinated by the unique patterns and the sparkling candy-coated paint that each car encompassed. "I always knew that I wanted to build a lowrider of my own," he says. "It took me three years to build it but I feel that each year was worth the wait. I always say that this car was a one-shot because whatever I did to the car only took one time to complete. Luckily there weren't any mishaps when I was building it, like most people go through. I feel very lucky to say that." Art talks about his car with pride and satisfaction. He feels that one of the things that makes his car unique is the simple fact that it's a clean ride. "I feel that my car can be described in one word: clean. When someone looks at it that's probably the first thing they'd say. And I agree all the way."

At age 20 Art moved to Riverside where he hung out with the Groupe Car Club, after being introduced to it by one of his friends. He attended the weekly meetings as well as the gatherings. Art begin to develop a bond with the car club members because they accepted him for who he was, as well as the fact that they enjoy the same common interest of lowriding. Art has now been a part of Groupe for three years and he admits that it has been the best three years of his life. One of his most memorable experiences was when he won First Place at the Arizona Lowrider Show. It played a significant role in his life because it was only his second time going to the Arizona show and then to take First Place was truly unexpected. That made him feel proud to know he had built a show winner.

In Art's opinion, in order to create a custom lowrider, a person must have drive, passion, and dedication. Without them, he says, there's no car. "I grew up around lowriding. I always knew that when I had enough money I would build my very own to take to the lowrider car shows and show off what I'd built," Art says. "I have a very strong passion for lowriding, it's in my blood. It gives me time to do something that I love and spend time with my friends. Although my wife doesn't like the scene too much, she remains supportive because she knows that's what I love to do".

Art would like to give a special thanks to his family, wife, kids, and his Groupe club members in Riverside. Although he takes a lot of pride in his '85 Cutlass, it is up for sale. "Yes it's up for sale," Art says with a laugh. "I've had it for four years, it's won trophies and respect, now it's time to go out and create another winner."