Traditions are special beliefs and behaviors passed down from generation to generation that never die. In that way, they are much like our lowriding way of life; a cherished school of thought involving automotive customization that has since evolved into an entire culture. The car clubs, individual riders, painters, mechanics, and customizers who came before us have all shaped the lowirders we have become. That establishment holds a special place to all of us in that we owe them to continue carrying the torch and bringing forth new ideas and designs. Take, for example, this issue's cover, which features a Monte Carlo owned by Danny Boy—a man whose character and ride represent the very words of "living in the past." The Groupe car club, in which Danny has been a member for nearly 35 years, is a tradition that he preserves and exemplifies to the fullest extent. To say he lives in the past is to do so only out of the respect he has for those who established the name he represents on the back of his club shirt today. The car itself personifies what a traditional lowrider looks like. Candy blue, velour interior, and all the moldings and bumpers gleaming from chrome. Danny Boy, like many others from other various car clubs has become "a caretaker of the old school." Back in the days, that mantra was reserved for those club members who were the founders of such organizations like the Sons of Soul, Orpheus, or the Gestapos, as they laid out the unwritten rules most car clubs and their car styles would ultimately follow from one generation to another. Just like a code or system handed down, the line in the sand regarding lowrider tradition has been drawn out there for decades. Has anyone tried to change or replace 5.20s and wire wheels? Why do only the popular styles of rides, years, makes, and models of lowriders stop in the '80s? Why do car clubs have plaques instead of decals that claim the name and town their club is from? It's because of those established standards that we routinely practice and solemnly uphold our past times. There are certain boundaries that all lowriders come close to or cross when it comes to customizing a badass ride. The Monte Carlo featured here represents that line in the sand. It represents the old school and as history repeats itself; the new school, as it continues to pass along its education onto the next class in line. Any recognition that lowriders receive today is only because of the custom cars and clubs from way back when. They paved the thankless Boulevards for us that now lead to the prestigious car shows across the country today. There are about 1,500 clubs in the Lowrider Club Registry and thousands of lowriders in the world today. We will die proudly with our addictive practices and fifty-year-old General Motors' popular-styled cars—along with our eighty-year-old Bombs, because that's cool too! "It is what it is," and as long as we protect the rules and styles set forth like the Monte Carlo featured here does, then so it will always be!

Speaking of glory days gone by, the Lowrider rig made the journey up to the Central Cal lowrider capital known as Fresno. The big return and re-union of these glory days was held at the Fresno County Fairgrounds, and was brought on by the collaboration of Maricella Rodriguez/LQ Productions, Lowrider magazine, and the city of Fresno. This effort did not go unrewarded either, as 850 entries showed up for the return event! Thousands of spectators roamed the show from Saturday afternoon and on up to the evening, and I think everyone was there in celebration of the show because they all seemed to have margaritas! This show was compared to the Individuals shows from the past, which I'm glad to say I witnessed awhile back. Yes, the fairgrounds were once again alive and well, and we can't wait for the encore return this August 2 so we can do it all over again—with a margarita in hand!

Lowrider magazine was also "On The Scene" for the coverage of Estillo car club's 20th Anniversary. They have a whole lot to celebrate when it comes to repping Texas for a couple of decades, so we all need to give them a round of applause for their commitment to being a family oriented car club with fine cars.

Saul Vargas put away his tech article tools and grabbed a hold of a surfboard for a break this summer as he visited Hawaii. There, he found a car club that lowrides on a higher level than some of the waves out there and captured them with his camera for a cool feature.

Stop by our "Konnected" segment and visit one of lowrider's biggest fans, as we feature one of Lowrider magazine's largest collections of memorabilia.

Like I mentioned, let's respect each other and appreciate the good times we have together, because there should never be animosity, greed, or jealousy towards one another. We are, in fact, all one car club and one family, so let's not pull each other down. Though the colors and names of our clubs are different, we are no different from each other in this way of lowrider life.

Long live cars on the floor,

Joe Ray